Tag Archives: police

10-CODE: Written by Cops Honoring the Ultimate Sacrifice

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“It is not how these officers died that made them heroes, it is how they lived.”

10-CODE is the first-ever anthology of stories written by 10 real-life cops honoring officers killed in the line of duty. Each author donated a fictional short story so that 100% of proceeds will benefit the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) in Washington, DC.

The authors, also sworn law enforcement officers have dedicated their respective works to a personal friend who has paid the ultimate sacrifice. While the stories may not recount the actual events, each author expressed the pain of reliving the loss of fellow officers.

New York Times best-selling author John Gilstrap’s heart-felt Foreword pays tribute to the service and sacrifices of our nation’s finest. NLEOMF CEO and President, Mr. Craig Floyd also promotes the Police Memorial’s support of 10-CODE by contributing the book’s Dedication.

Sworn Officers Kathy Bennett, Michael A. Black, Robin Burcell, Marco Conelli, Suzie Ivy, Rick McMahan, David Putnam, Mike Roche, Scott Silverii and David Swords selflessly donated their talents to honor the Fallen.

Paying homage to those who have sacrificed so we may know continued freedom is vital as a society. Showing respect and humanity for the loss of those who served is the purpose of 10-CODE.

Please support their legacy of service by ordering your copy today.

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TPD Celebrated 3rd Annual Blue Summit

“We are a shining example to the nation that you can combine compassion and policing to achieve great things.” Those are the words heard by Thibodaux Police Department personnel as Thibodaux Chief of Police Scott Silverii spoke at Blue Summit, the agency’s annual departmental meeting. The entire department gathers once a year to share a meal, receive awards, and hear from Mayor Eschete and Chief Silverii, who recap the previous year and share a vision for the next.

Chief“We’re going to continue to follow the course that has proven itself over the last four years” said Chief Silverii as he complimented the Officers for their hard work that resulted in a record low crime rate; citing the 45.25% reduction in criminal damage to property and the 40% reduction in burglaries. Chief Silverii also highlighted the importance of compassion in police work, touching on the department’s 64% verbal warning rate on all traffic stops.

“I love this department. I love being the Chief of Police in Thibodaux. I understand the significance of the past Chief’s before me, and the significance of those that will come after me,” said Chief Silverii as he spoke about the importance of legacy at the Thibodaux Police Department.

The department’s award recipients were received with standing ovations and loud cheers from their peers, who were clearly excited for the winners. Congratulations to the following award recipients:

  • Golden Team Award – Lt. Kevin Brooks, Sgt. Pablo Garcia, Officer Adrian Buchanan, Officer Jonathan Fryer, and Communications Officer Tremaine Rhodes.

Golden Team

  • Blue Valor – Officer Allie Faucheux

Blue Valor

  • Chief’s Employee of the Year – Animal Control Officer Kamie Burgos

Employee of the Year

  • Chief’s Officer of the Year – Officer Paul Thibodaux

Officer of the Year

Chief Silverii and the Thibodaux Police Department would like to thank all of our sponsors that helped make Blue Summit such a wonderful event. A big thanks to the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #52, House of Prayer in Thibodaux, TPD Jr. Police, the Sons of Chief Earl Melancon Sr. (Ret.), Mayor Tommy Eschete, MandyLens Photography, Room Solutions, Malik Hossel of Wendy’s fast food restaurants in Thibodaux, Dr. David Elias, Spahrs Seafood, Walmart, L&N, Gary’s, Rob’s Donuts, along with Clayton Dempster and Julius Clement.

TPD Celebrated 3rd Annual Blue Summit

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Honor Law Enforcement’s Legacy

What is the 10-Code project?

This is a first-ever collection of current & retired law enforcement officers who also happen to be published authors. Each donated their time and talent by creating original fictional stories based on a line of duty death.

10-Code is working with the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund to donate all proceeds to the Memorial. Every copy that you purchase goes toward honoring the legacy of officers killed in the line of duty.

Please pass this along and ask your friends and families to buy their copy today. Besides being a great cause, there are 10 great stories written by the authors who know cops best – other cops.

Please support their legacy of service by ordering your copy today.
Kindle – http://amzn.com/B00PR9QWJM
Paperback – http://amzn.com/150329322X
iBooks – https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/10-code/id955143897?ls=1&mt=11

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Ferguson & Public Engagement | What are they good for?

media

What’s the best time to plant a tree?

– 30 years ago.

What’s the next best time to plant a tree?

– Today

In general, law enforcement has made for horrible horticulturalists. We’ve not tilled the soil of community engagement as a practice. Now we wonder why no one understands us.

When an incident like Ferguson erupts, the pundits hurry to fend off allegations from a civilian population incessantly asking for answers. I’ve had so many tell how they’ve unfriended people on social media streams because of the content post-grand jury decision.

When a public service organization adopts a “No Comment” paradigm over the course of a few centuries, is it any wonder why questions and misinformation arises during societal flash points. While operational confidentiality is vital to an agency’s mission, the majority of daily operations and information processed by law enforcement fail to meet the level of classified materials.

Social media allows public agencies an opportunity to manage their own message. If an agency fails or refuses to engage in the often free mediums available for informing people, then they should expect to face the accusations of pent up frustrations.

This is a great opportunity for Chiefs and Sheriff’s to re-examine their public relations practices. It has to be more substantial than a few handshakes with kids at the high school ball game. An ongoing, open dialogue with the community we swore to serve builds bridges and breaks down walls.

A few suggestions:

  1. Balance the “official” tone of agency social media accounts. If you want the public to relate to the humanity of your officers, then present them as such.
  2. Not every public event has to be public. People distinguish “photo ops” from sincere neighborhood engagements.
  3. Proactively pursue the media for establishing mutual credibility. Yes, mutual.
  4. Ensure the designated “Voice and Face” of your agency is representative not only of the community, but of the vision and ideals for serving the public.
  5. When wrong, say “I’m sorry.”
  6. When right, give credit to the persons responsible. Whether it’s the rookie cop or the shop owner who dialed it in, give legitimate thanks.
  7. Don’t wait until a crisis to introduce yourself to the public you vowed to protect.
  8. Don’t take it person. Negative public comments are born out of the frustrations of not being heard. Re-evaluate practices to ensure you’ve not shut your community out.
  9. When times get tough, don’t be a prick.
  10. In all situations, be yourself – a single human being placed in extraordinary circumstances trying to handle unimaginable calamities. People understand if you trip, and if you do, refer back to #9.

Ferguson & Public Engagement | What are they good for?

Us versus Them | A Ferguson Outcome

If Not Us, Who?

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“If Not Us, Who?”

“If Not Us, Who?”

My heart weighs heavy in this week before the important decisions contemplated by a civilian grand jury in another state. After nearly 25 years of serving my community and country, I see the potential for an occupationalrevolution. The potential for substantially significant cultural change. While most revolutions are spurned through violence, this cannot be one of them.

Soon, events born in violence will again effect this country. Not just for today, but years to come. Regardless what you think of the decisions made by a civilian body, it’s critical to understand we are a nation of laws. You have the privilege (thank you military) to disagree with them, but not the right to break them.

The cultural evolution of expectations leading us away from the tenets of our founding fathers and the Constitution has left America in a state of moral and ethical conflict between knowing the laws, versus respecting the application of those laws.

Trapped in that conflict is the individual police officer. Empowered by the State to serve and protect, they’re also emasculated by that same State. Policies, regulations and public expectations factor heavily into each individual decision that police officer must make. Whether its writing a parking ticket or taking someone’s life.

The only constant in this equation is that not reacting is not an option for the police officer. An oath was sworn to with right hands raised. While truth, honor and sacrifice may have lost its significance to some, it’s still the reason that police officer leaves his family for duty.

They report for duty knowing that at any moment conflict may arise. It matters not if that conflict involves the braggart who claims to pay their salary, or the kid who marvels at the sun beaming off the rookies badge. The police officer swore to an oath, and no matter how human frailty may creep into that police officer’s singular decision at that one moment in their life, they and every police officer will be judged by that one moment.

When the decision is made to react to that conflict, despite the universal burden of knowing every eye is and will be upon you, a decision is made. It’s an unbelievable responsibility to take another person’s property, their freedom or their life. It’s one the police officer doesn’t take lightly. Most suffer lifetimes over a single or collection of decisions made at that point of conflict.

Yes, my heart is heavy on this eve before these decisions will be rendered. So many innocent people will be cast into a situation originally acted out on a single street in an unfamiliar town in an unknown part of the country.

It’s easy to sit back and criticize those who’ve sworn to protect others. Those officers who wear more scars on the inside than the critics have curses for their efforts, will thanklessly continue to report for their honored duty.

It’s easy to roar like a lion behind the keyboard. But when the time comes to be a lion; honestly, honorably and selflessly be that lion – to quiet accusing words without action or justification and do something for someone unknown for the greater good – will you?

There’s a reason a unified team of lions is called a PRIDE. Stay proud of your service BLUE – If Not Us, Who?

Us versus Them | A Ferguson Outcome

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