Lifting These Officers Up

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Please Help Lift These Officers Up:

Writers – I’ve never hesitated or asked for anything in return for helping you out with questions or explanations about police work, or any topic you may have needed to make sure your novels are amazing. Now, I am asking you to help a dear friend and fellow officer as Courtney fights for her life.

Readers & Friends – In the same respect, I’ve only, always been completely open with you, and enjoy the connections. If you know anything about me, it’s that I keep very few friends very close to me. Courtney’s husband, Pre worked with me in SWAT for years and is one of the people I trust with everything in this life.

Liliana Hart and I have committed ourselves to them, and we ask for your help. While I know they’d both be embarrassed by this post, I don’t really care. I love them both dearly and I’ll do whatever it takes to bring them peace while they fight the courageous fight.

I borrowed their story to share with you. Please Help Out:

Courtney Curole Prevost is a mother, wife, a daughter, a law enforcement officer, a leukemia survivor, and a friend. Courtney was diagnosed with an aggressive form of Leukemia on Easter of 2015.

She fought. Not only to get through chemotherapy but to get back to her children, her husband and fellow law enforcement officer, Todd, and her passion, law enforcement. Courtney beat Leukemia once. And now she is doing it again.

She relapsed. The Leukemia is back. And she is beginning the fight all over again. She is away from her children for the foreseeable future as she now requires a bone marrow transplant after the completion of chemotherapy.

Courtney, Todd and their three children need us to lighten their burden. Todd, a veteran law enforcement officer, has already begun steps to start a second job for additional income to supplement the loss of Courtney’s. This is a hard working couple who love their children, love their community, and love each other. Neither have ever asked for handouts.

Any donations will cover expenses that would otherwise be uncovered due to the loss of Courtney’s income. But more importantly, any donation will ease Courtney’s fears of burdening her young family and will allow Todd to be present for his children as they enter the next year without their mother at home.
https://www.gofundme.com/2h4246vw

FIT@50 / week 72

FIT@50 / week 72
Release, Relief, Renew:

Talk about a week for the books. This has been one emotional roller coaster for Liliana Hart and I. Maybe more like that ride that spins and you’re in a tea cup until you vomit. No, that’s not the ride. I really don’t know much about rides because they scare me. The same way Liliana scares me the week of a new novel.

We survived the release of her 47th title on Tuesday. Barely.

We cut our European adventure short to head home for catching up on lots of work. Instead, we discovered why we travel so much. It really stinks not having the kids at home. Sure it’s quiet, and we can stay up or sleep as we wish. There are no house chores or responsibilities other than paying the yard guy with exact cash.

As fate would have it, we scored an early return of four kids, and meandered through a series of cancelled and delayed flights to round out the team with Max. Who would’ve imagined it last week, but the band was back together.

Within the context of our crew, we focus on doing things with one or two of the kids in one-on-one activities. I risked personal safety by asking the 14 year old if she wanted a driving lesson. Before I could finish asking, she’d thrown on both sneakers and was down stairs waiting by the door. I wish she moved like that for Sunday morning church.

I’ll admit, not having had a daughter, I’m kind of at a loss around the two girls. We really had a great time. She, because she was driving, and me because I was alive. I also kicked it with the little dudes almost every day this week by running errands and an orthodontist visit.

There’s something about making decisions when it’s not your mouth stretched open with metal extractors. But, I either approved more dental work, offered the staff tickets to a Rangers’ baseball game, or put the youngest on the market for adoption. I told them Liliana would call later to straighten things out. Three days later and a van keeps driving by the house playing nursery rhymes. She’d better call quick—I’ll miss that little dude.

Finally, tonight all four of us guys headed to Gateway Grand Prairie church for their Top Gun themed men’s night out. Zip lines, dessert trucks, volleyball and a worship session that began with guitars ripping on the movie’s soundtrack. Now that’s church. We high-fived and ate ice cream until it was time to drag it on home. Totally exhausted is the way to end a Top Gun night. Funny part was when I snarled, “Yeah, Top Gun” and they all shrugged while waiting for more ice cream. They’ll learn about Maverick one day.

Reflecting on this week, I cherish the moments that have made it so special, but I dread admitting the reality. Truth is, this is our last week of summer all together. Max goes back to school on the 8th and the others head off to a camp all week.

Liliana and I joke about how nice it is while they’re in school. We get so much more work done that way. What I’ve learned getting FIT@50 is that it isn’t about the work produced but the family moments created. I am thankful for a week that included a major book launch, early returns of the kids and surviving driving school. The landscape will look drastically different next week, but no worries. Faith says push forward, and push forward we shall do.

Until next week, “I feel the need. The need for speed.”

Do Good,
Scott Silverii

 In case you missed last week, here you go. Remember to please visit and like my Facebook page for updates

Thank You To The Lafourche Parish Sheriff For Their Generosity

I’m proud to say that I served with the Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office for 21 years before taking the Chief of Police position in Thibodaux.  What a wonderfully generous act of kindness shown to the Dallas Police Department.

We are so grateful to the citizens of Lafourche Parish in Louisiana and their Sheriff’s Office for raising more than $50,000, which was donated to the Assist The Officer Foundation and the Dallas F…

Source: Thank You To The Lafourche Parish Sheriff For Their Generosity

Understanding Police: My PhD Research

Understanding Police Cover

Understanding Police: My PhD Research


I’m still in shock over the North Miami Police shooting of Charles Kinsey. I keep waiting for a plausible explanation before I make any comment on this. It’s hard, very hard to just remain silent.
 
So many folks want to understand the world of law enforcement, but will never gain an objective perspective. My research conducted for my PhD has been published twice – once as a textbook titled, Cop Culture: Why Good Cops Go Bad, and the other as A Darker Shade of Blue.
 
While the rights belong to my publisher, the research is all mine. I published this edition of my multi-year study on the organization and culture of cops to help you gain a factual view on the profession.
 
I tried cutting out the boring details about research methods and validity along with the qualitative methodology explanations – this will give you answers in a “PC Free” explanation.
 
I’d give it away, but Kindle requires 0.99 –>>1-Click

FIT@50 / week 71

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FIT@50 / week 71
The Bags:
 
Liliana Hart and I have blissfully caved at home this week. Although we worked while we travelled, there’s nothing like grabbing a spot in the house and hammering away until the tasks are done.
 
Forget TGIF, we experienced IFA – It’s Friday Already!!!
 
I have to admit it was different being home. Last time we were in the house it was full of kids, playing outside and nightly BBQs with meals on the patio. While we both enjoy the quiet, I think we missed the rowdy ruckus.
 
Along with playing catch up, our suitcases and clothes remain on the floor from our European adventure. We lived out of them for almost three weeks, why not a few more – right?
 
If you’d look through the window and see a mountain, you would be correct – it’s called our mail. In that mail are several slips of paper from UPS asking, begging, pleading for us to claim packages.
 
Do you remember what was in those packages?
 
Yes, our dirty clothes. Liliana wasn’t in too big of a hurry to claim those bags. Of course we figured we could wait until the kids came back and continue their life skills training. Or as some people call it – making them wash the clothes.
 
But, in a flash of awareness she changed her motivation towards claiming our bags. Why I asked. Because she has about $2,000 worth of shoes in one of them. And to think I only placed $100 worth of insurance on the shipment – just don’t tell her.
 
So if you happen to spot us slipping through Dallas looking slightly suspicious and embarrassed, it’s because we’d already claimed our batch of dirty clothes and her crazy fancy collection of expensive shoes.
 
Good news is, the kids will be back about the same time we crack open the bags with three weeks worth of dirty clothes that have been stuffed into bags and shipped halfway around the world.
 
Hey, it’s either that or they wash my motorcycle and mow the lawn at noon in this Texas summer. Life choices that children don’t get to chose are always the best to make for them.
 
Do Good,
Scott
In case you missed last week’s FIT@50 & Please Join me on Facebook.
 
 

Stretching the Police: Point Break

I posted about police reform in Change Responsibly – Stretching the Police this week. It was a longer than usual thought, so I wanted to talk with you also about the actual dynamics involved with policing and change.

Stretching the Police: Point Break

The original article

Change Responsibly – Stretching the Police:

Change Responsibly – Stretching the Police:

Going through old files, I came across a collection of video topics from my former agency’s annual summit. This, like many agencies host meetings to set the tone and sharpen the vision. There are only messages of community service through most agency missions.

Police are not the enemy. Their job is difficult and challenging. It is truly a double-edge sword where you’re the savior who pulls daddy off from molesting his daughter, yet become the villain because you’re taking her husband to jail for molesting their daughter.

By creation, police are the State’s arm of violence. Please allow me to explain while that soaks in.

While we’ve transformed over decades into the roles of community worker, counselor, teacher, preacher and anything needed at that moment, the legal reality is law enforcement’s function is to provide the surety that laws created by legislation will be honored or enforced if violated.

This is an example of a police officer’s oath of office. Most are required to be sworn, signed and filed in their clerk of courts’ office:

I……………………DO SWEAR,, THAT – I WILL WELL AND TRULY SERVE – OUR SOVEREIGN COUNTRY AND STATE – AS A POLICE OFFICER WITHOUT FAVOR OR AFFECTION – MALICE OR ILL-WILL – UNTIL I AM LEGALLY DISCHARGED, THAT I WILL SEE AND CAUSE ¬ OUR COMMUNITY’S PEACE TO BE KEPT AND PRESERVED – AND THAT – I WILL PREVENT TO THE BEST OF MY POWER – ALL OFFENSES AGAINST THAT PEACE – AND THAT – WHILE I CONTINUE TO BE A POLICE OFFICER – I WILL – TO THE BEST OF MY SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE – DISCHARGE ALL THE DUTIES THEREOF – FAITHFULLY – ACCORDING TO LAW.
SO HELP ME GOD.

Do you see term slike helper or friend or anything other than upholding, enforcing, preventing? It’s difficult for the community or the agencies to reconcile the requirements of their neighbor-citizen service versus their keeper of the peace roles.

This is a simple, not open for debate example of police force:

Cops don’t dictate the speed limit, but it is their duty to ensure the speed limits enacted by the legislative body are adhered to. What are the options of force? Posted speed limits signs are a form of force. Patrol cars parked in the speeding zone is another form of force. Running radar and warning drivers to slow down is an elevated form of force. Writing a speeding citation is yet another force option. Arresting the driver for speeding is possibly the highest form of force to make sure that limit on speed as established by a governing body is honored.

It may be cliché, but the saying, “We don’t make the laws, we enforce them,” is absolutely accurate. This isn’t an alibi for the extrajudicial use of police force, it’s just an illustration that the function of a police body isn’t to be your crutch or your punching bag. The job of the police are to ensure the laws of the jurisdiction are adhered to and enforced if violated.

Now comes the theoretical confliction.

The police are public servants. The term “servant” applies to helper on call to aid and assist in times of need or distress. This doesn’t sound like legislative muscle poised to enforce the law upon violation. No, it doesn’t. It’s a position of helper, and fixer.

Police are called upon more than 95% of the time to handle non-violent, quality of life circumstances. even in the most violent, crime ridden cities, police respond to violent crime calls only about 3% of the time. While this isn’t a statistical crime session, it is an example of what cops do with almost all of their other time on duty – Helping people fix their problems.

Can you imagine the personal dilemma of being trained, equipped and constitutionally commissioned with the empowerment of enforcing the laws of that jurisdiction, yet in almost 97% of calls for your assistance they are non-violent situations such as arguments between spouses, kids not wanting to go to school or a boyfriend not returning your daughter’s cell phone? You’ve not been trained by your employer’s academy to handle disputes with alternative resolutions or de-escalation techniques. You only know how to enforce the law and defend yourself and others.

The occupational dichotomy between the enforcer and guardian ethos is a powerful pendulum swing in either direction. Containing and directing those influencers is the function of the agencies’ heads and chain-of-command. An agency who gains a reputation of abuse, has failed leadership by allowing the domestic warrior mindset to overpower the community helper ideology.

In opposition, agencies ineffective at controlling crime, and focus more on appeasing political ambitions and personal agendas also exemplify failed leadership. It is a balance requiring monitoring every second of every day on every instance an officer interacts with the public.

So what does this all mean, besides spending the last ten minutes getting to the conclusion?

Police reform will not come easily. There are over 900,000 sworn officers – campus, city, county, state, federal and tribal, that work for 17,985 separate law enforcement agencies in the United States.

There is no one single governing body that dictates or influences these agencies. They, for the most part, are independent governmental jurisdictions who only answer to those within their respective political subdivision. Contrary to popular belief, while the FBI may have concurrent investigative jurisdiction with even a college campus police department, they do not have supervisory authority over any officer within that or any other law enforcement agency.

How do you affect change?

Reform will require changing the very mission, not just the practice of policing. A complete cultural overhaul that focuses on adopting the guardian ethos as opposed to the “us versus them” homeland soldier mentality. This change will require the same dynamics as any mass overhaul of disparate organizations – Clarity of Focus – Patience – Education – Accountability – Encouragement, just to name a few.

The reality is it will take a coordinated effort to develop best practice models based on multidisciplinary, social science approaches. That being said, it’s also vital to acknowledge the police cannot be everything to everybody. Society may have stretched the requirement of the police too far. Maybe the police just aren’t equipped to handle every one of society’s ills and quality of life concerns.

As an aggregate populace, it may be more productive to look at the entirety of what the police do for each community and evaluate what percentage of the whole are habitually acting in bad faith or illegal activity. Do good cops go bad? Yes. Do bad guys become cops? Yes, but that is the case in every profession. Are there bad kids in your child’s kindergarten class – Yes, so does that mean we march against little Johnny? No – it’s called life – bad things happen and are often caused by equally bad people.

Be warned!

Reform will result in a social service gap that has never been seen in this country. Even more concerning is that there are no public, private or social service agencies to pick up the slack once police stop doing the extra, non-criminal enforcement activities. For example – child custody exchanges, civil seizure of property, vehicle title verification, car insurance compliance checks, welfare concerns for the elderly or infirmed, delivering meals to the homeless, maintaining social media sites to keep us informed and enjoying the sense of community, funeral and wedding escorts, campaigning for their chief or sheriff’s election, visiting our kids at school to say hello, and the endless list of extras the profession has shouldered that have absolutely zero to do with the content of their sworn oath.

Can the profession of policing do better, be better? Yes. It has come so far since it’s inception. Can you force a 17,985 agencies juggernaut to change with violence against their communities and its their members? Absolutely not. If anything it will become more entrenched as a means of survival.

Becoming an agent of change requires more than a hashtag and bricks thrown. There must be direction and a definition of what that change looks like.

Police aren’t against changing to best serve their communities—they just need clear orders as to what their change will be. Don’t just demand change – define change, and uphold your end of the societal responsibility while that change is occurring.

Do Good,
Scott
Chief Scott Silverii, Ph.D.