FIT@50 / week 39

bayou bridge

FIT@50 / week 39
Let’s Walk
The water in the background is Bayou Lafourche. Growing up in Cajun Country I swam in that bayou, paddled a pirogue in that bayou, fished in that bayou and played in that bayou.
I never once in 50 years ever walked across that bayou. Not until recently. It was a Saturday festival downtown and we looked for the rare space to park.
I suggested we walk. And we did. About half way across I stopped and told Liliana Hart it was the first time I ever walked across this bayou. Of course we had to take a pic to memorialize the event that was 1/2 a century in the making.
Becoming FIT@50 I’ve stopped worrying and conquering everything in my path, squeezing into the closet parallel parking spot and getting everywhere 15 minutes early.
How many bridges are there in life that we avoid walking across because we just gotta get there fast?
It’s a simple picture on the surface, but on this Saturday afternoon I actually walked across water – Bayou Lafourche.
Do Good,
Scott
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FITx50 \ week 26

2015-01-28 20.01.56

FITx50 \ week 26

What do BL and I have in common? Other than an almost 50 year spread, we both love cheesecake. This was his first time tasting it. My sister had the great idea of sharing mine with the tyke.

End result – kid gets new treat and great uncle eats less cheesecake. Win – Win if you’re the one year old.

Kidding of course. This week has been fantastic as I returned to a regular schedule at Momentum Gym – I’ve heard all the crossfit horror stories, but seriously dude – use your head and moderation.

Oh, and most important – Keep your t-shirt on. No one wants to see man-boobs while doing box jumps. Well, not me anyway.

Remember March 11, 2015 is the date. Until then, stick to your goals and like Kim Lane always says: “Nothing tastes as good as good health.”

Lost that loving feeling?

Ways to Reinvigorate Your Passion for Policing

Consciously Adopt a Positive Attitude


police radio smilingIt can be very difficult to maintain a positive attitude and it is made even harder if you let yourself be negative for long periods of time. To begin the shift from negative to positive, start with being conscious of your self-talk. Start repeating positive comments to yourself several times a day to help drown out negative thinking.

Having a positive attitude not only improves your mood, but it has health benefits as well. According to the Mayo Clinic, a positive attitude can have the following health benefits:

 

  • Increased life span
  • Lower rates of depression
  • Lower levels of distress
  • Greater resistance to the common cold
  • Better psychological and physical well-being
  • Reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease
  • Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

Get Plenty of Exercise
Law enforcement officers must be physically fit for their job performance. While being physically fit is important, exercising is about more than just being fit. Exercise helps to:

  • Reduce stress
  • Ward off anxiety and feelings of depression
  • Boost self-esteem
  • Improve sleep
  • Strengthen your heart
  • Increases energy levels
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Improves muscle tone and strength
  • Strengthen and build bones
  • Helps reduce body fat
  • Makes you look fit and healthy

[Related: Tips for LEOs to Improve Their Physical Fitness Levels]

Set Progressive Goals
Sit down and brainstorm what you really want to achieve in your career, with your family, and in life in general. When brainstorming your goals, speak with your supervisor to get his or her input on your work goals to ensure they align with the department’s vision. In similar fashion, talk with your family members to get their input on your goals.

The outcome of your brainstorming session becomes your target and your primary objectives. Think about your goals in multiple stages and set micro-, midterm-, and long-term goals.

  • Micro-goals are goals that you want to accomplish on a daily basis. These should help you accomplish your short-term goals, which ultimately help you achieve your long-term goals. Maybe you want to be promoted at work, so reading recent news articles, applying to college to get an advanced degree, or reading a book about taking the police advancement test would be supporting micro-goals.
  • Midterm-goals are usually goals you want to achieve in one month to a year. Define the goal as well as what is to be accomplished. Be specific because general goals without a clear and concise timeframe and outcome are very difficult to achieve.
  • Long-term goals usually require about five years to achieve. Again, these goals need to be specific to make sure you work toward them over time and know when you have accomplished them.

Adopting this type of goal-setting strategy is effective because it is the little accomplishments—the micro-goals—that help you build the momentum and self-confidence needed to achieve your short- and long-term goals. As you work toward your goals, be sure to visualize yourself accomplishing each one. A positive attitude will come naturally when you feel that you are on track to reach your goals..

Embrace Meditation
One of the best ways I have found to reduce stress and keep a positive attitude is through meditation. Meditation involves sitting quietly or with calming music for a few minutes a day. As you meditate, let go of the negative thoughts and replace them with positive thoughts.

I started off with 5 to 10 minutes a day of sitting quietly and reflecting on my life and what I want out of it. I have increased my meditation time to about 30 minutes each morning, which gets me off to a great start. It is amazing how much my attitude has changed and how many positive ideas I have just from meditating very day.

One of the best ways to get started is to find an app on your phone that either plays calming music or features a voice walking you through the process. Whatever method you choose, the key is to get started.

I encourage every police officer to try these techniques. If you find something that works well for you, please comment on this post so we can all learn new strategies for being more positive in our jobs and lives. Such positivity leads to a better work environment, a closer family, and longevity.

 

Matt LouxAbout the Author: Matt Loux has been in law enforcement for more than 20 years and has a background in fraud, criminal investigation, as well as hospital, school, and network security. Matt has researched and studied law enforcement and security best practices for the past 10 years.

SEPTEMBER 29, 2014

By Matthew Loux, criminal justice faculty member at American Military University

 

 

Ways to Reinvigorate Your Passion for Policing

Five Things

This is your Thibodaux Police Department

FIVE THINGS LAW ENFORCEMENT EXECUTIVES CAN DO TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

1. Crime is rarely random; patrols shouldn’t be either.

Focusing on small geographic locations and times when crimes occur and targeting specific, high-impact repeat offenders can decrease crime.

KD map 2

2. Quality is more important than speed.

In most cases, thorough investigations, problem solving and careful forensic evidence collection contribute more to arresting suspects than shaving a few seconds off of initial response times.

3. DNA works for property crimes, too.

Collecting and using DNA evidence substantially increases the likelihood of solving property crimes — leading to twice as many arrests and twice as many cases being accepted for prosecution than in non-DNA “traditional” investigations.

4. In police work, perceptions matter.

When people see the police as fair, lawful and respectful, officers are safer and citizens are more likely to obey the law and comply with police orders. For example, the way an officer treats a stopped motorist influences the motorist’s opinion about law enforcement more than whether the officer issues a citation.

jamal and lance

5. Make officer safety and wellness a priority.

Safety training, certain shift lengths and using body armor can prevent injuries and save lives. For example, the “Shift Length Experiment” study showed that officers who worked 10-hour shifts
(compared to 8- and 12-hour shifts) made fewer errors and worked less overtime, saving money for the jurisdiction.

Team Thibodaux PD
Team Thibodaux PD

 

To learn more, visit NIJ.gov, keyword “Five Things.”

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