Preparing Your Mouth: Speaking Life & Death

On the flip side, think about the spiritual, emotional and social deaths when harsh, threatening or negative words are spoken. Telling a child they are stupid or no good, only curses them for future hurt from someone they loved to nurture them.

Read the Entire Article – Click HERE

 

Who Do You Hurt Like? David, Solomon or Absalom

Who Do You Hurt Like? David, Solomon or Absalom

This is my latest article for Law Enforcement Today

I’ve been so blessed that they have featured these articles in a Faith & Family section. This article really applies to everyone dealing with pain from an unresolved past.

Which are you most like?

David

Solomon

Absalom

CLICK HERE FOR ORIGINAL ARTICLE

 

Sex Addiction: Blue Lights in a Red Light District

Anytime we begin to discuss pain or addiction in the public square, people get real quiet. This article that I wrote helped shake things up. Posted on 01-16-18 in Law Enforcement Today

It was true 30 years ago and it’s still true today. The first time I was told, “Your badge will get you sex (he used the “p” word), and sex will get your badge,” was in the police academy. I kinda smiled because honestly, I didn’t have a clue what the sergeant meant.

I wasn’t naïve, but it was a new world, and assimilating into the cop culture exerted constant pressure to fit in. It’s tough to go against the flow with an all-for-one fraternity. After decades on the job, I was curious to understand the powerful allure, and how it transformed everyone from high school dropouts to college grads to military crossovers into a blue sea of homogeneity.

READ THE REST OF THE STORY –

Sex Addiction: Blue Lights in a Red Light District

Policing & Personal Pain: Freedom for Healing from Your Past

I wrote this piece for Law Enforcement Today. I once contributed to this great resource from a chief of police perspective on policy and leadership, but now focus on well being, spiritual health and family because that’s where God has led me to serve.

READ ARTICLE

Healing from your past is about gaining freedom from the things, people or events that have shackled you down and prevented you from knowing God’s glorious plans for your life.

For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.

Jeremiah 29:11

I wanted to share this article in hopes of it helping you to begin the process of healing, and gaining your ordained freedom. Jesus died on the cross and conquered death so that we may know salvation and an abundant life in Him.

Stop by LET and drop a comment or say “Hello.”

Much Love/Much Respect,

Scott

Policing & Personal Pain: Freedom for Healing from Your Past

Incredible Virtues

Incredible Virtues

On September 12, 2001, we collectively vowed as a nation to take into account all that happened the previous day. “We will never forget,” read signs from coast to coast. FDNY and NYPD ball caps sold in record numbers. Thirteen years later I want to make good on that promise. May we remember the companionship lost, the laughs now restricted to our memories, and the human touch that was severed on one of the darkest days in American history.

While we solemnly pay tribute to those lost, may we also cherish the living. I wish to honor all marines, soldiers, sailors, airmen, and coast guardsmen, but especially those who join the civilian law enforcement community after completing their military tour of duty.

Regardless of what our tough exterior communicates, we are people who love humanity. The nature of our work is a testament to this love. We respond to aid those in need when others freeze. We run to trouble when most run from it. Yes, indeed, the law enforcement community in general exercises what is called the greatest gift; love. “So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love,” wrote Paul the Apostle in a deeply moving letter to those he cherished in Corinth.

Most people remember where they were on September 11, 2001. I was a patrol lieutenant serving as watch commander on swing shift in Orange County, California. I worked September 10, 2001 and arrived home at 2:30 a.m. on September 11. I was jolted by the news that greeted me when I awoke later that morning. I remained glued to the television all day.

One year later the Fountain Valley High School planned an assembly to commemorate the first anniversary of 9/11. I was honored when our chief offered my services to speak when the school asked for a representative from the police department. Trying to introduce meaning into the event from my perspective, I wrote a poem to share. It expressed what I believed then, and still believe today.

Of 2977 people who lost their life that day, 23 were from the New York Police Department, 37 from the Port Authority Police Department, 343 from the New York Fire Department, and 125 from the Pentagon. Countless others received long term emotional and physical trauma resulting from the day that will be forever etched in our memory.

The poem that follows is a tribute to the police officers and firefighters who valiantly served the citizens of New York, in both life and death, on that tragic day. They are words of respect for heroes from United Airlines Flight 93 who forced the plane to the ground near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, undoubtedly saving many other lives in the process. They are thoughts to pay homage to the brave servants at the Pentagon, to all others who perished on September 11, 2001, and to those fighting the war on terror since that time.

Freedom comes with a price tag! Throughout history it has been purchased with an irreplaceable commodity, the blood of those willing to sacrifice their lives for the benefit of others. We do it because it’s at the core of our being. What an incredible virtue!

“Incredible Virtues”

Freedom wasn’t free

The price was sweat and blood

Freedom wasn’t free

Soldiers wounded in the mud

“Declaring Independence”

We shouted to the world

We sewed our stars and stripes

‘Old Glory’ was unfurled 

Our nation has been growing

For a couple hundred years

We’ve had more highs than lows

More smiles than the tears

Then evil hit our shores

Twelve months ago today

We chose no other option

But to respond the American way

We responded with our courage

With allegiance and our might

We responded with our sympathy

With fury and our fight

On a single dollar bill

The bald eagle sits in place

With the olive branch of peace

And the arrows of war in case

9/11 shook our world

Even on the Far West Coast

Note to other evildoers

We’ll defend what we love most

What we love most in life

Includes family and our friends

Two things that they stole from us

But it’s not the bitter end

We have three more they cannot have

Faith, hope, and love within

And since they are secure in us

Liberty’s torch will never dim

—Jim McNeff

jimmcneff

Jim is the author of The Spirit behind Badge 145. He worked in military and civilian law enforcement for thirty-one years. While in the USAF he flew as a crewmember aboard the National Emergency Airborne Command Post—a presidential support detail. Following his military service, he served for twenty-seven years with the Fountain Valley Police Department in Orange County, California where he retired as a lieutenant. During his career in law enforcement, he worked with, supervised, or managed every element of the organization. He holds a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice from Southwest University and graduated from the prestigious Sherman Block Supervisory Leadership Institute as well as the IACP course, Leadership in Police Organizations. Jim is married and has three adult children and three grandchildren. You can contact him at jrmcneff@gmail.com or view his website www.jimmcneff.com which is geared toward helping officers.

– See more at: http://www.lawenforcementtoday.com/2014/09/11/incredible-virtues/#sthash.Hq21INMu.dpuf

Incredible Virtues

Chicago is Adopting The “Broken Windows” Strategy | Law Enforcement Today

Chicago Police Department

Chicago is Adopting The “Broken Windows” Strategy

Editor’s NOTE: In a city with a high propensity for violent crime, do you think fixing windows and erasing graffiti is the solution? Is The broken windows theory a crime fighting strategy or a quality of life improvement plan? Either way, something’s got to give.

May 5, 2013 in Crime, Crime Prevention, Featured, Posts by Jean Reynolds

In January, Chicago’s Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy announced that 200 police officers were going to be reassigned to patrol work. Two weeks later, McCarthy had more news for Chicago residents:

Focusing on the little things

He is proposing an ordinance to authorize arrests for unpaid tickets for public urination, public consumption of alcohol, and gambling—“the three top complaints,” he said, from Chicago residents.

“Fixing the little things prevents the bigger things,” said McCarthy, a longtime advocate of the “broken windows” approach to fighting crime. “Broken windows” is the brainchild of social scientists James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling.

The theory behind it

They claimed that unrepaired windows, litter, and other signs of neighborhood decay constitute an announcement that a neighborhood has stopped taking responsibility for the quality of life in its public spaces. The next step is for responsible citizens to start moving out—and for lawbreakers to move in.

To learn more about it

To Read More about Chicago’s paradigm policing shift;  Chicago is Adopting The “Broken Windows” Strategy | Law Enforcement Today.

Police Dispatchers: Unsung Heroes and Lifelines

Police Radio Communications Operator

Wrapping up our week of honoring Dispatchers is this piece posted by one of my favorite sites, Law Enforcement Today

Dispatchers; we truly appreciate you.

Dispatchers: Unsung Heroes and Lifelines

by Niki Tallent

March 14, 2013

According to the LA Police Protective League in discussing the shoot out with disgraced former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner, “The chilling audiotape makes one thing clear: the civilian dispatcher did an outstanding job.

She performed flawlessly during this critical tactical incident. Her calm and professionalism most certainly saved officer lives. Being a police dispatcher is harder than most people think. In this case, the dispatcher fulfilled her duties with unfailing focus, composure and expertise. The incident underscores the essential role played by the dedicated emergency services dispatchers nationwide.”

You can listen to this brave dispatcher’s amazing job performance here:

http://lapd.com/blog/sheriffs_dispatchers_performance_during_big_bear_shootout/

Hearing someone’s last thoughts, panic and fear pour through a headset as you are sitting in a room helpless and wanting to protect could be the worst moment of your life.

The worst possible call I could ever receive would be an “officer down” call. Just thinking about it makes my heart do a flip-flop. This is not just because I am married to a LEO, but because I am a lifeline.

A dispatcher is a…

via Dispatchers: Unsung Heroes and Lifelines | Law Enforcement Today.

About the Author:

Niki Tallent married to her LEO James Tallent reside in Arkansas with their 5 sons and one dog. Niki is a 911 operator/dispatcher and her husband James a Deputy at Pulaski County. Niki went to Lakeside High School and soon started working as a dispatcher after her first son was born. Niki became Director for Arkansas Wives Behind the Badge Auxiliary after wanting to support LE even more. She joined Wives Behind the Badge Arkansas Auxiliary in March of this year, trying to find my place to help impact Arkansas LEOWs. In September She took over as Director of Arkansas Wives Behind the Badge after talking it through with my husband, whom at first was skeptical of the workload involved. The support for me from other LEOWs was absolutely amazing.