FIT@50: An Odd Space For A Kettlebell

 

FIT@50

This was fun. Going to the gym and not really sure where to move to get out of everyone’s way. So there’s this guy, big guy, and he’s pushing the earth off his chest on the bench press.

There’s like two feet of space between him and the other guy grunting like he’s trapped in a mouse hole with an angry cat on his trail.

I grab a kettlebell and begin doing something useless to warm up that involved a lot of bending and stretching, but just shy of becoming a Richard Simmons’ routine.

The mirror shows both guys impatiently waiting. I suddenly feel like I’m there as entertainment for them and I pick up my kettlebell and slip into a corner.

Yeah, I’ll admit that standing in the middle of the open floor space probably wasn’t wise, but hold on, I’m going to say it, “Nobody puts baby in the corner.”

Thankfully it got much better after that. Mostly because Atlas set the world back on its axis and grunty-grunter’s wife showed up and they became more interested in what was on TV than my location.

The best part of this workout was when I experienced for the first time in about 7 years that my t-shirt felt more snug around my chest and arms than it did around my gut.

I snapped this pic of a barbell I found on the floor. No actually, I was using it. But, for the first time in so long I cared nothing about how much it weighed, and everything about how it made me feel. It made me feel healthy.

It’s way too early in the fight to proclaim that I’ve reclaimed not just my health, but my joy. Although, this is the best I’ve felt about my chances of taking control in a long time.

It’s an odd shackle when the devil tells you that there’s still too much work left to be done at the desk, and I shouldn’t leave Leah to go exercise. The last few weeks I’ve been able to free myself of the guilt of turning in less than a 16 hour day, to dedicate an hour to my fitness.

So, in reality, who cares how much weight sits on either end of that bar? I’m here and that’s what counts.

Do Good,
Scott

FIT@50: An Odd Space For A Kettlebell

FIT@50: The Devil’s Whisper

FIT@50

After a few visits to the gym, I’ve finally started to feel like I’m actually working out as opposed to struggling to get by. But oh that old devil that resides besides each encouraging thought.

No sooner had I set the dumbells into the rack did I drop onto the padded bench to take a breather. I felt good about the effort. Then my eyes scanned over to the “dark side” of the weight rack. You know, the lower rack where the big, heavy dumbbells sit.

I heard the whisper, “Look how weak you’ve become over the years.”
Then I was reminded of the promise, and I replied, “But I am here.”

Gaining freedom from our past can be tough, but once unshackled, our lives become free to soar.
Do Good,
Scott

FIT@50: The Devil’s Whisper

FIT@50: Let’s Do This

FIT@50

Several years ago I began to journal my journey toward turning 50. It was intended to encourage a move for getting back into top shape. Instead, it became a reflection of maturing into the next 50 years.

So here we are almost 3 years since my 50th birthday, and although life has been a blessing, I’ve done nothing to restore my health other than relying on great genetics.

As the body would soon tell, living a sedentary work-from-home lifestyle eventually overcame DNA. Especially with a daily diet of ice cream and bags of Oreo cookies.

Like any reluctant 50+ year old guy, I delayed “that” physical for as long as I could. As anyone could guess, the visit didn’t go well, but was a long way from good.

Now I’ll spare you the results, except to say things have got to change, unless this heart wants an attack in a few short years. While there’s not much we can actually control, this is one thing I can definitely influence.

Leah & I have always been transparent in an effort to encourage people to be decent to others in all aspects of life. I feel moved to restart my FIT@50 in hopes of:

– Holding myself accountable
– Encouraging men to take their health serious at this stage
– Combining faith, marriage & life with a healthy balance
– Getting others to see the long-term effects of poor habits
– Returning to the joy of sharing my thoughts on anything from exercise to couch pillows (I said balance, remember?)

I promise, this isn’t a “gym rat” adventure. But I did return to that place I once loved. Except it was different because someone had made what used to be light weights, feel heavy and immovable.

Do Good,
Scott

FIT@50: Let’s Do This

FIT@50Week 94: Approaching the New Year Happily

FIT@50Week 94: Approaching the New Year Happily

FIT@50 – Week 93: It Feels Good

How do you encourage your kids to lean on the truth?

FIT@50 / Week 92: Ugly’s Last Stand

FIT@50 / Week 91: I See You

FIT@50 / Week 91: I See You

Our kids are well, kids. They rattle on when they should just hush and shut down when they should shine. But alas, they are kids. I’d say for the most part they are pretty socially capable. Relatively speaking of course. After all, the boys are 7, 9, and 10.

They’ve all noticed I enjoy talking with people. The 13 year old calls me mister sociable, and then the 7 year old stumbles over the pronunciation of “sociable” to ask what it means. She smacks of early teenage condescension, “It means he talks a lot.”

Ahhhh, 13.

I’m happy they take notice.

What Leah Silverii and I teach the kids is to see people. I’m sure you understand what I mean, but to children, they are working to understand the difference between, “Watch out for that person,” and “Watch that person.”

I don’t talk to people just to fill space or hear myself pontificate over the weather or current state of affairs. I enjoy seeing them. It may be just a smile and hello, or a chat about travelling circuses. The subject matter doesn’t matter. It’s about making a human contact.

What does matter is making a human connection. It starts because my head is always up and my eyes are always looking forward. First is the cop in me. I visually scan everything. The second part is the benefit of making eye contact. It never fails to connect with someone else.

Once that visual connection is made, words naturally flow after a smile. And that is the simple art of being mister sociable.

There are folks who’ve not been seen their entire lives. Others who feel the weight of no longer being seen. Either side of the coin, it’s a horrible feeling to traverse this life invisible to everyone around you.

Since I retired from a very public position, and moved to an entirely different state, I could easily see how becoming one in a sea of anonymous anybodies could negatively affect you.

Going from instantly recognized, to one of the crowd in a big city was odd for me. I was used to the uniform serving as an instant ticket to enter into any conversation. Now, no one had a clue who I was or what I once did.

What I discovered was the most critical point of being social. It wasn’t the uniform, or the job, or the familiar locale. It was having my head up, eyes open and being receptive. I’ve always looked to see others. I cherish making the connection and the follow up with a few encouraging words.

I’m glad our kids see this. We want them to understand the value of being seen, but more importantly, seeing others. Everyone has value. Their exterior may be presented in faded jeans and a flannel shirt, or an expensive business suit, but it’s what in and behind the eyes that matter most.

Every holiday season is a challenge for me to minimize the seasonal depression that has plagued me since my teens. This year is no different, but without the facade of a uniform and shield, I’ve enjoyed more than ever being wide-eyed and sociable as me, and not the police chief.

Another wonderful benefit of seeing is also being seen. Give it a try. Don’t just look at someone. Look into someone. Each has a story to share. Maybe they’ll bless you with it if you hang around just a bit.

I See You.

Do Good,
Scott