Methodist Church Makes Stand | Will It Fall?

The Big Question

Are you willing to stand for what you believe even if it’s unpopular? How about if half of your friends threatened to dump you?

Thanks to relentless social justice warriors, one of the largest Protestant congregations in the United States was forced to make that very decision. The United Methodist Church (UMC) faced demands to allow for homosexual clergy and that clergy perform same-sex marriages.

This showdown became the battle cry between the John Wesley-inspired orthodoxy and those who demanded that the historic denomination make fundamental changes to accommodate liberal wishes.

Their Decision

Despite the huge bullseye on the congregation first started in the 18th century, threats to split the church into two camps pressured conservative traditionalists to vote according to the LGBT agenda. In February of 2019, UMC officials rejected the liberal attack. But will it stand?

As soon as the final vote was tallied, talks began of creating a new alliance for homosexual-friendly churches. This is no small ordeal as there are about 12 million members. Talk about willing to make a stand for what they believe!

This latest attempted denominational hostage-taking failed, but even in the UMC’s victory, it may eventually cost them their congregation. Is that enough to reverse course and abandon the majority who decided to uphold the founding principles?

Our Challenge

You know, we men face this dilemma often. Maybe not on the scale of affecting 12 million worshippers, but what influences our lives is important to us. We regularly address challenges that may have serious consequences.

Sexual purity is one of many challenges we face. If married, the command to remain faithful can be marred by temptation. If we’re single, the discipline to avoid sexual sin is paramount. We face other decisions that strain relationships, careers, our health, finances and general quality of life. 

How do we ensure that the choices we make, although unpopular, are the right ones for our life?

Our Compass

We’re men of action, and want to make things happen. Too often, if it doesn’t, we retool and try again without considering the consequences. How about instead of being so quick on the trigger, we check our compass, and take a moment to consider the costs.

No matter how many friends (usually just acquaintances) you lose, the price for doing what is right is never more than you can afford. On the other hand, choices made because others think it’s what you should do, although morally, ethically or spiritually corrupted won’t bear fruit in your life.

Take the proactive tactic and prune negative people from your life who don’t support you. Some people claim it’s “unChristian” to eliminate others from your life. People who spend little time in God’s word are usually the to use it as a weapon against you.

And while the bible tells us to love your neighbor as yourself (Matthew 22:39),  love each other deeply (1 Peter 4:8), and to love each other as I have loved you (John 15:12,) it doesn’t say that you must ruin your life for those who do not believe. 

Do not yoke yourselves together in a team with unbelievers. For how can righteousness and lawlessness be partners? What fellowship does light have with darkness?

2 Corinthians 6:14 Complete Jewish Bible (CJB)

Your Goal

Whether you’re a Christian or a non-believer, the UMC’s example should remain a shining light.

Stick to your principles.

Keep your eyes focused on God’s will and His word. The naysayers will try their best to change your course. Disagreeing with someone doesn’t mean you have to dislike or argue with them.

In a civilized atmosphere, it simply means we agree to disagree. Tolerance and respect for differences of opinion should be what holds us together, not rips society apart. But always make sure in your tolerance of others that you never corrupt what you know to be true. It’s never worth the costs.

What Do You Think

What are your thoughts about this? Has the United Methodist Church messed up by not changing with the times to remain culturally relevant?

Are they better off with a smaller congregation of people with strong, similar beliefs?

What’s the difference between compromise and being compromised?

Any other thoughts about this?

Your Mission Assignment

Thanks for connecting with me here at The Bro Code. There are so many brothers out there struggling to connect, or to make their voices heard. We men are stronger together. Share this article with other brothers and invite them to connect here and our Brick Breakers Men’s Ministry page on Facebook for encouragement and fellowship.

Much Love & Respect,

Scott

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2 replies »

  1. The Methodist church most certainly did the right thing. Will it last, doubtful. It’s my understanding that without the African churches, homosexuality would have won.

    That doesn’t say much about the members of the Methodist church does it?

    Pruning is good. We, as men, likely don’t do it enough.

    • I agree in that it doesn’t say much. Especially for the Americans. Pruning has been a big life lesson for me over the last several years. It’s so important for new growth. Take care, Brother.

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